Lowest Prices • Free Ground Shipping Call Us! 800-421-0833 Watchlist  Watch Later Help   |   cart My Cart 
(0)
  |     |   Mobile Site

X
Your cart is currently empty.

Your watchlist is currently empty.

Once & For All: Stopping Sexual Harassment at Work

Posts Tagged ‘Trust’

Building Trust With Patients: Trust Point Exercise

Saturday, August 13th, 2016

Activity: Trust Point Exercise
Time: 50-60 minutes

Set the stage (5 minutes)
Remind participants that a big part of patient satisfaction stems from the degree to which a patient trusts his or her healthcare provider. It is crucial that everyone in the healthcare field understand that each encounter with a patient represents a “trust point” in which you either build the patient’s trust in you, or lose their trust.

  • Trust points involve contact with our patients by phone, in person, by email, by any means.
  • Trust points are an opportunity for the patient to learn something about us as an organization, and about us as individuals.
  • The best trust points leave a positive impression on the patient.

Explain to participants that the purpose of this activity is to help them:
– Understand the relationship between patient care, clinical interaction, and organization/practice success.
– Review typical patient interactions and identify trust points.
– Examine trust points and develop ways to improve the patient experience.

Introduce the Activity (5 minutes)
Tell participants that over the next 40-50 minutes, they are going to take a close look at the trust points in their practice or department, and how they interact with and relate to patients through these transactions. Explain that this will be a small group activity, with each group discussing one of the four phases of the patient care experience. When all groups are done, they will report back to the full group on the trust points they’ve have identified.

Say: Let’s examine our practice/department by breaking it down into four main phases of the patient care experience (write these on the flipchart):

  1. Check-In – from the time a patient makes an appointment or walks in the door.
  2. Procedure or Visit – the actual clinical interaction we have with a patient and the patient’s reason for coming to us.
  3. Recovery and Follow-up – this can be as complicated as post-surgery or as simple as providing test results or calling in a prescription.
  4. Behind-the-Scenes – insurance processing, setting appointments, transferring files, matching forms, calculating costs, arranging for home medical equipment, etc.

Each of these phases provides a series of trust points with our patients – so each one has plenty of opportunities for us to fail or succeed.

Hand out the Trust Point worksheet. Click here for worksheet PDF.

Ask the participants to break into four groups. (They can use any method they want to create four groups, but each group should include staff from different practice areas to promote idea sharing.)

Assign each group one of the four practice phases: Check-In, Procedure or Visit, Recovery and Follow-Up, or Behind-the-Scenes.

Have the groups use the Trust Point Worksheet to guide the discussion of their assigned practice phase.

Have groups complete the activity. (20-30 minutes)
Give each group a flipchart page. Have them create their flipchart page to look like the Trust Points Worksheet.

Say:

  1. Identify a “reporter” for your group. The reporter will fill in the flipchart and present your group’s findings to the full group in the next step of the workshop.
  2. Identify as many trust points as you can in for your assigned treatment phase. Write these in Column 1.
  3. For each trust point, write what the patient needs in Column 2.
  4. In Column 3, write what we need for each trust point on the practice side of the equation – including any technical or system requirements.
  5. In Column 4, write down what we need or expect from each other at each of the trust points.
  6. Later, we’ll use Column 5 to brainstorm how to make things better for the patient at each of the trust points you identify. We’ll do that as a full group.

Walk around the room to answer any questions.

Debrief the Activity (20 minutes)

  1. Have the reporter for each group post their flipchart and describe their small group’s findings for their assigned phase.
  2. Begin the brainstorming process. For each Trust Point, ask the full group to come up with ways to make things better. The reporter should write these in Column 5 of their flipchart.
  3. Depending on the time you have available, allow more or less discussion of each group’s ideas.
  4. Tell the participants that you will type up the completed flipcharts and make them available for everyone’s use after the workshop.

Ask:
Where do we go next? How can we start to implement these suggestions?

 

This training activity excerpted from the Leader’s Guide for the best-selling It’s a Dog’s World training video from CRM Learning. Preview the video and see why it is our all-time best-selling patient satisfaction training video. Also, check out our It’s a Dog’s World e-learning module. This e-learning is the perfect way to reinforce individual employees’ knowledge and skill after the group has viewed and discussed the video.

Conquer Team Dysfunction

Monday, August 12th, 2013

Learning to Deal with a Dysfunctional TeamLike it or not, all teams are potentially dysfunctional. This is inevitable because they are made up of fallible, imperfect human beings. From the basketball court to the executive suite, politics and confusion are more the rule than the exception. However, facing dysfunction and focusing on teamwork is particularly critical at the top of an organization because the executive team sets the tone for how all employees work with one another.

A former client, the founder of a billion dollar company, best expressed the power of teamwork when he once told me, “If you could get all the people in the organization rowing in the same direction, you could dominate any industry, in any market, against any  competition, at any time.”

Whenever I repeat this adage to a group of leaders, they immediately nod their heads, but in a desperate sort of way. They seem to grasp the truth of it while simultaneously surrendering to the impossibility of actually making it happen.

Fortunately, there is hope. Counter to conventional wisdom, the causes of dysfunction are both identifiable and curable. However, they don’t die easily. Making a team functional and cohesive requires levels of courage and discipline that many groups cannot seem to muster. (more…)

The One Thing that Changes Everything

Tuesday, April 30th, 2013

Both customers and employees need to feel that they can trust an organization’s leadership to make sound decisions, communicate clearly, and respond swiftly and appropriately to challenges and opportunities.  Leadership carries many responsibilities, and the first and foremost of these responsibilities is trustworthiness.  When trust breaks down, customers leave and employees disengage.

It’s commonly thought that once trust has been lost, it cannot be regained.  Fortunately, that’s not true.  These three steps can help increase trust in your organization, no matter where you and your leadership are on the relative scale of trustworthiness. (more…)

Permission to Fail, Sir?

Monday, April 29th, 2013

Organizations whose cultures forbid failure are organizations that will become stagnant, lacking the resourcefulness and innovation necessary to succeed.

When failure isn’t an option, there’s no incentive to take even the smallest risk in trying something new.  If an employee knows he’ll be punished for failing, he’ll be careful to stay well within the boundaries of accepted practice.  And then it’s not just failure that isn’t an option; it’s any kind of change or improvement.

Obviously you don’t want to encourage wildly impractical risk-taking or invite catastrophic failure.  So how can you encourage employees to take sensible risks, learn from their mistakes, and – as the saying goes – “fail forward” into success? (more…)

Listening for Success: Free Activity

Saturday, April 20th, 2013

Have you ever listened to your own thoughts … while you were listening to someone speak?

Chances are those thoughts were filled with ideas about what you were going to say as soon as they stopped speaking.  Arguments, agreements, stories about your own experience – any number of bright, beautiful thoughts and ideas take shape in your mind as you “listen” to what the other person is saying.

Studies of communication conducted as far back as 1988 show that we spend only about 25% of the time listening to someone talking.  The remaining 75% of the time is mostly filled with, yes, all those bright ideas about what we’re going to say in reply. (more…)

Do Sweat the Small Stuff

Wednesday, February 13th, 2013

Respect isn’t one single big thing.

It’s not a task on our to-do list that we can check off at the end of the day.

And it’s certainly not the same as political correctness (which, ironically, can often lead us to say and do things that are almost as painful as the politically incorrect, stereotyping statements we’re trying to avoid).

Respect is the glue that holds us together in groups.  It’s all the small things that add up, day by day, week by week, year by year, to build relationships … or break them down. (more…)

Trust: Communication Is Key

Tuesday, May 11th, 2010

To see real change and gain significant benefits from their strategies, leaders need to establish an environment of trust. Leaders who are trusted — even in times of great difficulty — are skilled communicators.

When leading in times of change and transition (and who isn’t?), remember communications fundamentals, including these:

Communicate relentlessly. Communicate information, thoughts and ideas clearly — and frequently — in different media. Find many ways to share information; keep processes open and transparent.

Listen. Good communicators are also good listeners. Allow people to air their gripes and complaints. Pay attention to what others are saying, thinking and feeling. What is said, and what is left unsaid.

Explain. People are often skeptical of change. Share your thinking and the trade-offs you’ve weighed — not just the final decision or strategy.

Articulate expectations. Clearly explaining why, how and when things need to happen will set expectations and create a healthy level of stress and pressure. It also establishes a mechanism for monitoring and addressing performance.

Be visible. If you communicate well, you won’t be out of sight. Find ways to interact with all of your stakeholder groups.

Confront problems and conflict. Don’t postpone dealing with challenging issues or conflict. By avoiding the difficult people or difficult issues, you can do great harm to yourself, your co-workers and your organization.

Be honest and sincere. Communicate truthfully and honestly, follow through with what you say and avoid deception.

This article was adapted from the CCL publication Leading With Authenticity in Times of Transition.


 

close X
For Federal Government Customers:
CRM Learning is a division of Media Partners Corporation and all government orders are invoiced by Media Partners.

Media Partners is registered with SAM.
Cage Code: 3Q5F1, Status: Active, Expiration 01/31/2021

Too busy to preview today?
Put products in this Watch Later queue so they're easy to recall next time you visit.

Make sure you're logged in when you put videos in the queue!
Log in now.
If you don't yet have a preview account, create a limited or unlimited access account.