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Once & For All: Stopping Sexual Harassment at Work

Posts Tagged ‘Accountability’

3 Words That Put Ideas into Action: “I’ll Own That”

Thursday, April 24th, 2014

Employee AccountabilityNothing is more energizing than having great ideas fly around a meeting room and everyone is engaged in solving problems and getting things done. In tough economic times, seeing employees express ideas about how to keep the business booming is especially rewarding. “We should put this on the website!” “We can get advertising to highlight this feature in the next marketing campaign!” “Customers will love the ability to download this information!”

You want to keep these great expectations moving from one meeting to the next and ensure that the best ideas are not allowed to stall. It’s important that the great ideas “we” need to act on are not lost. Those ideas are gold and the miners of that gold are in the room.

The Problem with “We”
To get to the gold, you must eliminate the Nothing Has Been Done with the Great Ideas We Had in the Last Meeting syndrome. And why does nothing get done? Because “we” were going to do it.

To harness the power of every employee you must remember that the pronoun “we” doesn’t do anything or get anything done. When a person says “we” should do something, that’s great! What’s even greater, though, is when everyone is led to move a “we” to an “I”… with an accompanying “by-when”.

Imagine how the results of your team will skyrocket when individuals begin saying things like…“We have come up with some great stuff! I am especially excited about customers downloading this information. I’ll own that, and by the next meeting I will have an outline for you.” (more…)

Training Success Story – Accountability

Sunday, December 1st, 2013

The Problem: Employees at the corporate headquarters of a premium fashion and home décor company loved to start creative projects, but weren’t the best at finishing them.

The Solution: Build accountability throughout the organization with Accountability That Works! training from CRM Learning.

Accountability TrainingThe Success Story: The Accountability That Works! program was a significant part of a top to bottom, company-wide focus on learning how to get things done. Managers received initial training from Versera Performance Consulting (a sister company to CRM Learning), and later, several internal employees were certified to teach the program. It’s now part of every new employee’s orientation and is also offered on the training calendar twice a year.

At first, trainers used the script directly from the Accountability That Works! Leaders Guide, but later modified training to include company-specific examples. Participant workbooks kept everyone focused, and the format was also broken up into shorter blocks. Leaders reported a significant positive shift in attitudes when it came to making and keeping commitments. Employees who received the Accountability That Works! training were more willing to take ownership of projects, learned how to create clear agreements up front, and were more likely to head off conflicts that could derail their goals. (more…)

Conquer Team Dysfunction

Monday, August 12th, 2013

Learning to Deal with a Dysfunctional TeamLike it or not, all teams are potentially dysfunctional. This is inevitable because they are made up of fallible, imperfect human beings. From the basketball court to the executive suite, politics and confusion are more the rule than the exception. However, facing dysfunction and focusing on teamwork is particularly critical at the top of an organization because the executive team sets the tone for how all employees work with one another.

A former client, the founder of a billion dollar company, best expressed the power of teamwork when he once told me, “If you could get all the people in the organization rowing in the same direction, you could dominate any industry, in any market, against any  competition, at any time.”

Whenever I repeat this adage to a group of leaders, they immediately nod their heads, but in a desperate sort of way. They seem to grasp the truth of it while simultaneously surrendering to the impossibility of actually making it happen.

Fortunately, there is hope. Counter to conventional wisdom, the causes of dysfunction are both identifiable and curable. However, they don’t die easily. Making a team functional and cohesive requires levels of courage and discipline that many groups cannot seem to muster. (more…)

Worksheet: 6 Questions to Ask Before You Start a Task

Tuesday, June 4th, 2013

This exercise from CRM Learning gives participants a chance to use a series of questions to explore and understand the scope and requirements for a project. This worksheet can be a great guideline for ‘making sure they understand’ any future tasks they take on.

Instructions: Think about a project you’ve recently been assigned, or a task you’ll be taking on soon. Use the questions below to make sure you understand the task before you begin. (more…)

10 Things You’ll Never Hear From a Truly Accountable Person

Friday, May 10th, 2013

1. I did my part; I can’t help it if other people didn’t do theirs.

2. Nobody gave me a deadline, so I just figured I had all the time in the world to do it.

3. I never really did agree with the decision, but I wasn’t about to say that to my boss.

4. What a mess—someday someone should really clean this up.

5. They never tell us anything! (more…)

Stop Playing the Blame Game!

Monday, August 20th, 2012

“Responsible people do not blame circumstances, conditions, or conditioning for their behavior. Their behavior is a product of their own conscious choice.” – Stephen Covey

You know, there are lessons all around us if we just open our eyes, and we are never too young or too old to learn. I witnessed a lesson in the making on blame and responsibility as I listened to a conversation between my three year old grandson, Trey, and his father, Deuce. It was almost time for Trey’s 3rd birthday party to start and he was biding his time with his sister, Emme, until his friends arrived. He was playing along nicely until pandemonium broke out and Trey came crying to his father about something his sister did to him. There he was, whining to his Dad about what Emme had done to him, and his Dad responded with, ‘And what did you do to her?’ Trey immediately quit crying, turned around walked off without saying a word. I almost fell off my chair. Out of the mouths of babes. Even in his three-year-old mind he knew that blaming his sister was not going to cut it. My grandson knew without a doubt that he was just as responsible as his sister for the fight. (more…)

Civility At Work

Friday, January 14th, 2011

20 Ways to Build a Kinder Workplace

by Tom Terez

It’s not always easy being nice. There are deadlines to meet, conflicts to settle, resources to share, promotions to snag — all of which can pit people against each other. What to do? Here are 20 practical ideas. If you believe that workplaces work better when people get along, scan this list and start living it. (more…)

Holding Others Accountable Role Play

Monday, April 6th, 2009

In high performance organizations, individuals not only strive to keep the commitments they make, they are also willing to confront co-workers who don’t keep theirs.  However, holding others accountable can be awkward—especially when the “other” is a peer.  This role play enables both team leaders and team members to work through the discomfort of these situations in a non-threatening environment.

 

“A Little More Time” Role Play Scenario

Marketing VP Kimberly is preparing her 45-person consulting firm’s major proposal for a year’s worth of work from a major client.  She knows that demonstrating the staff’s depth of experience will be the key to winning this contract.  That means a strong, focused, well-written resume section in the proposal document.

 

At the weekly managers’ meeting, Kimberly asks Sam to take responsibility for collecting the resumés and background information from seven team leaders who will have key roles on the project.  Sam will need to make sure the resumés are up-to-date, consistent in format and clearly focused on the client’s industry.  Only four of this group are present at the meeting.  Sam is one of the seven.  He willingly accepts ownership for the task and aims to please.

 

It is three weeks until the proposal is due.  Sam and Kimberly meet to discuss how the resumés will be used in the proposal—but they don’t spend time discussing the actual process of collecting and updating them.  Kimberly expresses her appreciation to Sam for taking on the task, and he agrees to have the updated resumés to her in ten days. No problem—it all seems straightforward enough.

 

Ten days later, 3:30am.  Sam is working at home the morning before his deadline.  He is rewriting two of the resumés, and he is missing another two altogether.  Sam was certain he had emailed these managers to request their resumés,—they work in one of the firm’s out-of-state offices and he doesn’t know them well.  His own resumé and the ones he received from two other team leaders are in good shape.  He decides to ask Kimberly for two more days to complete the assignment.

 

Set Up the Role Play

Instruct participants to read the “A Little More Time” scenario (above). Have them role play two ways of concluding the scenario.

1) First, role play Kimberly responding when Sam comes to her to ask for several more days to complete the assignment.  One partner plays Kimberly, the other plays Sam. Allow no more than five minutes for this role play.

2) Second, role play a scene between Sam and one of the team leaders who has not provided their information to Sam.  One partner plays Sam, the other plays the team leader. Allow no more than five minutes for this role play.

 

Debrief the Role Play Activity

 

Ask the participants:

 

1. How comfortable were you in the first role play where Kimberly was responding Sam’s request for more time? 

 

2. Did people find it more difficult to hold a peer accountable in the second role play? If so, what made it more difficult?

 

3. What are some things a person should do when holding another person accountable?

Look for responses such as:

·       First, ask yourself, “How may I have contributed to this poor result—was I clear about what I needed?”

·       Don’t jump to conclusions, hear the other person out.

·       In the discussion, use “I” statements such as “I have trouble keeping my commitments when I don’t receive your information by the deadline.”

·       Work together on a plan to rectify the situation and determine how to keep it from happening again.  

·       Ask “What do you need from me? More notice, more help, better instructions, etc.?”)

 

4. What are the consequences of not confronting those (either subordinates or co-workers) who have not kept a commitment?

This material excerpted from the Leader’s Guide to the video program, Accountability That Works!.


 

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