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Once & For All: Stopping Sexual Harassment at Work

Posts Tagged ‘Team effectiveness training’

Teamwork Day-to-Day

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014

Team Effectiveness TrainingDisasters, accidents, and other emergencies pull teams together.

But what about the day-to-day realities of being on a team when there’s no adrenaline fueling a sense of urgency, and no life-impacting goal galvanizing team members into a cohesive whole?

There are five factors that impact team performance, whether in a crisis or simply in day-to-day operations.

  1. Luck

Don’t waste time and energy complaining about bad luck or what’s going wrong. Be aware of problems, but put your focus on what’s right; then you can take advantage of the factors working in your favor.

  1. Communication

Clear language, concise, specific requests, and double-checking for understanding aren’t just “nice to have.” Whether you’re in crisis or in your standard day-to-day process, focusing on clear communication should always be a priority for your team.

  1. Preparation

(more…)

6 Tell-Tale Symptoms of the Abilene Paradox

Tuesday, September 30th, 2014

Team Effectiveness TrainingIn our previous article we wrote about a humorous family “trip to Abilene” and the concept of the Abilene Paradox.  We also discussed
how the Paradox affects us in both our personal and work lives.   Today, we’ll explore six tell-tale symptoms of the Paradox.

Remember that professor Jerry Harvey described the Abilene Paradox as the inability to manage agreement rather than the inability to manage conflict.  This inability to manage agreement is the essential symptom that defines individuals and organizations caught in the web of the Abilene Paradox.

Consider this workplace scenario:

Sue, Tony, Jasmine and their manager, Chris, all have strong reservations about implementing a proposed procedural change.  Individually, each one is convinced the change will cause more problems than it will solve.  BUT, because the proposed change was suggested by a highly-paid consultant, and because no one else is voicing their concerns, each individual claims to support the plan (when they really don’t). The procedural change goes forward…seemingly with unanimous consent.  Later, when troubling operational issues surface, the  group members get annoyed with  one another and blame the consultant for giving bad advice. Eventually—despite a hefty investment in the flawed new procedure—the organization decides to go back to the old way of doing things.  Susan, Tony, Jasmine and Chris never discuss the matter again. (more…)

Delegation: Develop, Don’t Dump

Saturday, August 30th, 2014

Delegation for SuccessIntellectually, we know delegation is good. It’s a way of developing staff — helping them learn and grow and preparing them for bigger roles within the organization. We also know it’s good for us to let go of having to do everything ourselves.

But when we ask others to do a task…how can we be sure the other person will do it right?

Well, we can’t be sure, of course. But we can be consciously intentional about picking someone whose skills and attributes are a fit for the job at hand.

Instead of just “dumping” your request on the nearest person’s desk, take a moment to assess three factors:

  1. What skills are needed?

For example, accurately compiling a cost comparison report requires skill with numbers and familiarity with spreadsheets. Crafting a blog post for your department requires skills in research and writing.

  1. What attributes are needed?

Someone with good logistical skills can easily handle the basics of scheduling an important meeting – but if they’re not friendly and empathetic, they might not be the best person to manage the tricky diplomacy required to get senior management to juggle their calendars.

  1. What risk is involved?

(more…)

Cross-functional Teams: The Leader’s Role in Building Synergy

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

Cross-functional Teams: The Leader’s Role in Building SynergyOrganizations won’t be successful with a cross-functional team approach if departments within the organization have been overly isolated or are mired in an “us versus them” mindset.

What can a leader do to build synergy in these types of dysfunctional cross-functional team situations?

1. Start by making first-hand observations. Walk around the organization and ask people how things are going; seek their input on the issue at hand. Visible leadership (when employees can SEE leaders walking around and talking to folks) builds morale and lets people know that someone cares about what they’re doing and thinking.
2. Build bridges between roles and job functions. Encourage everyone to look beyond their immediate surroundings and give them opportunities to form productive working relationships with people in other departments. A beyond-the-barriers mindset ensures useful information is shared and not kept in “silos”. (more…)


 

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