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Once & For All: Stopping Sexual Harassment at Work

Posts Tagged ‘Health’

Building Trust With Patients: Trust Point Exercise

Saturday, August 13th, 2016

Activity: Trust Point Exercise
Time: 50-60 minutes

Set the stage (5 minutes)
Remind participants that a big part of patient satisfaction stems from the degree to which a patient trusts his or her healthcare provider. It is crucial that everyone in the healthcare field understand that each encounter with a patient represents a “trust point” in which you either build the patient’s trust in you, or lose their trust.

  • Trust points involve contact with our patients by phone, in person, by email, by any means.
  • Trust points are an opportunity for the patient to learn something about us as an organization, and about us as individuals.
  • The best trust points leave a positive impression on the patient.

Explain to participants that the purpose of this activity is to help them:
– Understand the relationship between patient care, clinical interaction, and organization/practice success.
– Review typical patient interactions and identify trust points.
– Examine trust points and develop ways to improve the patient experience.

Introduce the Activity (5 minutes)
Tell participants that over the next 40-50 minutes, they are going to take a close look at the trust points in their practice or department, and how they interact with and relate to patients through these transactions. Explain that this will be a small group activity, with each group discussing one of the four phases of the patient care experience. When all groups are done, they will report back to the full group on the trust points they’ve have identified.

Say: Let’s examine our practice/department by breaking it down into four main phases of the patient care experience (write these on the flipchart):

  1. Check-In – from the time a patient makes an appointment or walks in the door.
  2. Procedure or Visit – the actual clinical interaction we have with a patient and the patient’s reason for coming to us.
  3. Recovery and Follow-up – this can be as complicated as post-surgery or as simple as providing test results or calling in a prescription.
  4. Behind-the-Scenes – insurance processing, setting appointments, transferring files, matching forms, calculating costs, arranging for home medical equipment, etc.

Each of these phases provides a series of trust points with our patients – so each one has plenty of opportunities for us to fail or succeed.

Hand out the Trust Point worksheet. Click here for worksheet PDF.

Ask the participants to break into four groups. (They can use any method they want to create four groups, but each group should include staff from different practice areas to promote idea sharing.)

Assign each group one of the four practice phases: Check-In, Procedure or Visit, Recovery and Follow-Up, or Behind-the-Scenes.

Have the groups use the Trust Point Worksheet to guide the discussion of their assigned practice phase.

Have groups complete the activity. (20-30 minutes)
Give each group a flipchart page. Have them create their flipchart page to look like the Trust Points Worksheet.

Say:

  1. Identify a “reporter” for your group. The reporter will fill in the flipchart and present your group’s findings to the full group in the next step of the workshop.
  2. Identify as many trust points as you can in for your assigned treatment phase. Write these in Column 1.
  3. For each trust point, write what the patient needs in Column 2.
  4. In Column 3, write what we need for each trust point on the practice side of the equation – including any technical or system requirements.
  5. In Column 4, write down what we need or expect from each other at each of the trust points.
  6. Later, we’ll use Column 5 to brainstorm how to make things better for the patient at each of the trust points you identify. We’ll do that as a full group.

Walk around the room to answer any questions.

Debrief the Activity (20 minutes)

  1. Have the reporter for each group post their flipchart and describe their small group’s findings for their assigned phase.
  2. Begin the brainstorming process. For each Trust Point, ask the full group to come up with ways to make things better. The reporter should write these in Column 5 of their flipchart.
  3. Depending on the time you have available, allow more or less discussion of each group’s ideas.
  4. Tell the participants that you will type up the completed flipcharts and make them available for everyone’s use after the workshop.

Ask:
Where do we go next? How can we start to implement these suggestions?

 

This training activity excerpted from the Leader’s Guide for the best-selling It’s a Dog’s World training video from CRM Learning. Preview the video and see why it is our all-time best-selling patient satisfaction training video. Also, check out our It’s a Dog’s World e-learning module. This e-learning is the perfect way to reinforce individual employees’ knowledge and skill after the group has viewed and discussed the video.

Stretching Exercises at Your Desk: 12 Simple Tips

Sunday, January 26th, 2014

Try these stretching exercises at your desk — or anywhere else — to ease back pain and boost Constant Climb Toward Total Fitness People Walkingenergy.

You may feel awkward doing stretching exercises at your desk. But right now, as you sit there at your computer, you are doing one of the worst things you can do to your body — you’re sitting still. And not only that, but the way you sit — and type, and hold the phone — may be wreaking havoc on your bones, joints, and muscles.

“People who sit at their computers for hours every day — they’re in for serious medical problems,” says Sharon Hame, MD, associate clinical professor at UCLA’s department of orthopedic surgery. “We’re seeing more things than carpal tunnel; those pains go up the arm to the elbow and shoulder and then translate to the neck and back. It’s a huge problem.”

In addition to carpal tunnel and other traditional ergonomic issues, new problems are cropping up, Hame says. “I saw a woman yesterday who had tennis elbow. She got it at work from the way she answered the phone and worked at the computer.” The solution, experts say, is to break up your work by doing stretching exercises at your desk.

Relieve Back Pain With Stretching Exercises at Your Desk
Aches and pains, not to mention the weight gain that can result from hunching over your desk all day, are just the beginning. “People shouldn’t be complacent about moving just because they’re not obese,” says Angela Smith, MD, orthopedic surgeon at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia and former president of the American College of Sports Medicine. “There are a lot of skinny people who, because they don’t exercise for strength and balance, are osteoporotic fractures waiting to happen.” (more…)

Fight or Flight: The Evolution of Stress

Thursday, April 14th, 2011

IMAGINE you are a caveman out innocently picking berries when suddenly you come nose to nose with a saber-tooth tiger. While you were simply gathering, the tiger was actually hunting, and the sight of you makes his mouth water. (more…)


 

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