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Once & For All: Stopping Sexual Harassment at Work

Posts Tagged ‘Change’

4 Ways to Combat Negativity at Work

Wednesday, September 2nd, 2015

attitudevirusworkforce_thumbNegativity in the workplace can be related to overwork, job insecurity, lack of leadership, boredom, lack of rewards, personality conflicts and many other factors.

Any one of us can be tempted to “go negative” from time to time.  Sadly, for some, it is the way they communicate most of the time. Whether you are working to combat your own negativity or are needing to respond to negativity from others, here are a few things to keep in mind: (more…)

Too Much Change? Here’s How to Avoid a Victim Mindset

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

Change is a constant. Whether it’s the annual stress of open enrollment for health care (“Wait, what? My coverage is changing again?”) or an unexpected shift in your job focus (“But I thought the lime green widget was a priority. When did we change to the purple gizmo?”) — the one certainty is that change is going to happen.

Taking Charge of Change video imageAnd there’s one thing we do have control over: how we respond to change, even when it comes at us out of the blue.

We can get stuck being a victim. You know those people, right? They’re the ones holding a pity party in the break room. Or, we can respond positively and keep moving forward. You know those people, too. They’re the ones who are more fun and interesting to be around!

Here are five tips for staying out of a victim mindset, even when it seems like everything is blowing up around you. (more…)

Mentoring and Change: Creating an Environment for Successful Transitions

Friday, June 6th, 2014

Change ManagementChange is the Only Constant

Change is upon us, and we no longer doubt that it has become the way of life in our decade and beyond. In the real world, change occurs only when people embrace it, champion it, and have the courage to move onto uncharted paths. Successful change is about discovery and resistance, and attending to the needs of the people who are an integral element of the process.

Mentoring As Support for Change
Effective mentoring is a powerful way to address people’s needs during change, thus reducing resistance, and opening the path for the new desired future.

Mentoring Competencies That Support Growth
The ability to guide people through successful change is linked to specific mentoring competencies.

Successful mentoring relationships act as vehicles that enable people to develop the new behaviors that are necessary for change. These relationships are based on simple, but powerful principles:
• Mutual trust, developed as a result of mutual respect;
• Commitment to growth and discovery, through support and challenge;
• Openness to give and receive help and feedback;
• Commitment to action and results, the ability to make it happen.

Examples of Mentoring Help during Change

Each phase of transition offers different mentoring challenges. The following examples illustrate how mentoring behaviors can be tailored to meet specific needs.

Phase 1. Optimism
Early in the change process people may have an unrealistic view of what is required. Mentoring can provide a direction that keeps people on an even keel, and helps them understand the full impact of what is needed during change.
The mentor accomplishes this by asking good questions that help people identify their individual reactions to the change. This questioning process looks at both positive and negative aspects of the change, and helps identify future needs. By also sharing his/her own experiences with change, the mentor makes the change experience real and possible. (more…)

Accelerating the Possibility Curve

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

By Dewitt Jones

It’s 8am in the middle of the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge. I’ve been photographing snow geese since long before dawn.  Thousands stop here on their yearly migration and, until an hour ago, the morning sky had been crowded with them. Now, however, the sky is empty.

“They’ll bed down right after dawn and won’t get up for anything after that,” the Ranger had told me, “‘About the only thing that frightens them once they’re down is a low flying plane and we don’t get many of those around here.”

Well, they were sure “down” now. I could hear them all squawking somewhere over the corn rows in front of me. A good bit of hiking and I found them, thousands of them, in a tiny lake in the middle of the reserve.

I set up my long lens and waited.  An hour.  Not one flew.  Another hour.  Nope, they certainly were “down.”

In the heat of the morning, my mind began to wander. Strangely, looking at that empty sky and the immovable snow geese, I found myself thinking about the nature of change. In so many areas of our lives, we simply don’t want it. None of us want to get older, or face a new onslaught of IRS regulations, or like having our favorite TV series dumped unceremoniously from the airways. (more…)

Becoming More Resilient – in 3 Easy Steps

Tuesday, July 9th, 2013

Becoming More Resilient in the WorkplaceResilience is the ability to be flexible in the face of adversity and apparent setback. Or, to put it in the words of one of our emotional intelligence experts, resilience is “the ability to bounce or spring back into shape after being stretched, bent, or compressed.”

In nature, we see resilience in trees that bend with the wind instead of breaking. In business, we see resilience in the organizations and individuals who adapt as situations evolve.

While some people seem to be born with naturally high levels of resilience, others of us struggle. The good news is that everyone has the capacity to become more resilient. (more…)

Just One Thing

Saturday, May 25th, 2013

“If you think you are too small to make a difference, try sleeping with a mosquito.”

“The secret to the big is the small.”

The first quote is an old African proverb; the second is from our training resource Ordinary People, Extraordinary Results.  Understanding them can help create a significant shift in perspective for anyone who feels limited in their ability to have a real impact or to demonstrate true leadership.

Combine that shift in perspective with these three questions, and you have a powerful (yet simple) approach to creating change, one small step at a time. (more…)

Permission to Fail, Sir?

Monday, April 29th, 2013

Organizations whose cultures forbid failure are organizations that will become stagnant, lacking the resourcefulness and innovation necessary to succeed.

When failure isn’t an option, there’s no incentive to take even the smallest risk in trying something new.  If an employee knows he’ll be punished for failing, he’ll be careful to stay well within the boundaries of accepted practice.  And then it’s not just failure that isn’t an option; it’s any kind of change or improvement.

Obviously you don’t want to encourage wildly impractical risk-taking or invite catastrophic failure.  So how can you encourage employees to take sensible risks, learn from their mistakes, and – as the saying goes – “fail forward” into success? (more…)

Life, in 5 Short Chapters

Tuesday, January 31st, 2012

by Portia Nelson

Chapter 1

I walk down the street.
There’s a deep hole in the sidewalk.
And I fall in.
I am lost. I am helpless. It isn’t my fault.
It takes forever to find a way out. (more…)

10 Steps to Surviving Change – Elegantly

Monday, August 23rd, 2010

By Sarah Steele
If I say the word CHANGE, how do you feel? Most people remain fearful, anxious and uncomfortable with change, despite it being a driving issue in our society. It appears that no matter how much experience we have it doesn’t get any easier.

Gaining a level of understanding that allows you to be productive, creative and flexible with your own life as well as helping others handle change is key to succeeding in today’s ever-changing world.

Follow these 10 steps to help you cope with the transitions in your life:

1. Recognize that things DO change
Nothing is forever. Neither the good, nor the bad. You will be much less frustrated if you accept the change and decide to manage it, rather than desperately try and cling onto the way things used to be.

2. Pinpoint the specific change you are going through
Because any change has a number of implications in different areas of our lives, we tend to generalize the change we are going through. Stay focused on one aspect of the change by identifying what you are most afraid of losing as a result of this change and then understanding why that loss is uncomfortable. For example, a new computer system may mean you will no longer feel competent. Feeling incompetent is a very different issue than fighting new technology, and can be easily addressed with training.

3. Accept the loss factor
Admit to yourself that regardless of whether or not you experience this particular change as good or bad, there will be a sense of loss. This is the “better the devil you know scenario” that leads us to put up with a situation we know isn’t good for us. Clearly define the change and recognize the areas of your life that will not change as a result.

4. Seek valid information
You will doubt the facts and struggle to believe anything you hear, see or feel about the change. Write down what information you need to know and who can provide you with that data. Ask straight questions, remain open to views that may be different to your own and listen to what you are being told.

5. Take action
Now that you have information, kick-start some forward momentum by taking both physical and mental action. Focus on taking the first baby step by setting priorities, committing to someone else what you will achieve and by when, and exercise (even if it’s only a 15 minute walk each day).

6. Recognize the Danger Zone
There comes a point where we choose to move on with the change and discover the opportunities it brings, or to give in to the fear of the unknown and remain fearful, anxious and in denial. Recognize that this normal, and don’t allow yourself to succumb. Increasing your small, regular action steps will help you keep that forward momentum going.

7. Make a decision
All the information you gathered may seem overwhelming. To avoid analysis paralysis set yourself a deadline for making a decision and do whatever it takes – even if you resort to flipping a coin! The secret to this is to break big decisions down into small, bite-sized chunks and work on one at a time. This way, decisions are easily reversible.

8. Identify the benefits
All change has some benefits. A divorce can give us the opportunity to have control of the remote, a new job could teach us new skills and starting your own business can provide you with the chance to follow your passion. Understand what the benefits of the change are and recognize them for the great gifts they bring you.

9. Change? What change?
I promise there will come a time when you stop looking at the change as something different. You will have integrated its challenges and victories into your life and will now feel more stable and open to what the future may hold. Remember everything you have learned for the next exciting, exhilarating and, oh ok, scary change.

10. Identify a change partner
Change is a constant in today’s society that you will go through many times in many different situations. Finding a change partner who is committed to encouraging you and supporting you will make the whole experience less scary and probably speedier. This may be a coach who can remain dispassionate, hold the mirror up to your fears and hold onto your highest goals. Or it might be a colleague at work who can help you see both sides of a situation.

Sarah Steele is founder of Atlantic Coaching, www.atlantic.coaching.com.
Article source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sarah_Steele

Training Resource: Taking Charge of Change
A rookie skydiver serves as a metaphor in this action-packed video, which helps people of all ages adapt to big changes – and thrive.


 

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