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Once & For All: Stopping Sexual Harassment at Work

Posts Tagged ‘Change Management’

Too Much Change? Here’s How to Avoid a Victim Mindset

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

Change is a constant. Whether it’s the annual stress of open enrollment for health care (“Wait, what? My coverage is changing again?”) or an unexpected shift in your job focus (“But I thought the lime green widget was a priority. When did we change to the purple gizmo?”) — the one certainty is that change is going to happen.

Taking Charge of Change video imageAnd there’s one thing we do have control over: how we respond to change, even when it comes at us out of the blue.

We can get stuck being a victim. You know those people, right? They’re the ones holding a pity party in the break room. Or, we can respond positively and keep moving forward. You know those people, too. They’re the ones who are more fun and interesting to be around!

Here are five tips for staying out of a victim mindset, even when it seems like everything is blowing up around you. (more…)

A “Learning/Discovery” Approach to Change

Tuesday, October 21st, 2014

Today’s organizations face change in a variety of areas…at an unprecedented rate. And though we’ve been told that constant change is the “new normal”,  we usually look upon it with fear and negativity.

Susan Campbell, author of From Chaos to Confidence, has an interesting take on the topic.  Campbell views navigating change as being a lot like surfing:  “Successful surfers stay just ahead of the wave that could wipe them out at any moment.  They use the power of this very same wave, participating with the wave, not fighting it or trying to control it.”

In the same way, to survive in a constantly changing workplace, Campbell says we must learn to relate to our environment rather than trying to control it.

One way to do this is to shift our mindset from “Security/Control” to “Learning/ Discovery”.

If we maintain a Security/Control mindset we focus on stability ( i.e. knowing the rules, being around people like us and having things turn out predictably).  We don’t like uncertainty, change, lack of structure or people who don’t share our point of view.  We view change as a loss of control.

Alternatively, when we develop a Learning/Discovery mindset, we become open to experimenting in unfamiliar situations.  Because we relate to our environment rather that trying to control it, we focus on creatively developing ourselves to succeed in our changing environment.Instead of worrying about what we’ve lost, we ask, “What does this moment require of me?” This attitude shift is very empowering, making change an opportunity for growth.

According to Campbell, when we get trapped in a world of wishes and fears, we lose the power to deal effectively with reality and the options it holds.   The key to getting “unstuck” lies in letting go of attitudes and reactions that don’t work and focusing on ones that do, like those listed below: (more…)

The Abilene Paradox – How you can skip the trip!

Monday, October 13th, 2014

confroomIn our first article of this series, we learned how a family trip to Abilene on a 104-degree Texas afternoon led Professor Jerry Harvey to discover what he calls “The Abilene Paradox.” The paradox occurs when groups take actions in contradiction to what the individual members really want to do. Remember that Professor Harvey described the Abilene Paradox as the inability to manage agreement rather than the inability to manage conflict.

We’ve also explored six tell-tale signs that will help us recognize when we might be on a” trip to Abilene” and four underlying psychological dynamics that create the conditions for the Paradox. The question is…what do we do about it?

If we believe our group or organization is caught in the Paradox – and is “on the road to Abilene” –Professor Harvey recommends we speak up and confront the Paradox in a group setting. Working within the context of a group is important, because the dynamics of the Abilene Paradox involve collusion among group members.

The first step in the confrontation is to “own up” to our true beliefs and be open to the feedback we receive when we share them. By owning up, we let others know we’re concerned that the group may be making a decision based on inaccurate data. To illustrate this, let’s revisit this workplace scenario (from article two). (more…)

Mentoring and Change: Creating an Environment for Successful Transitions

Friday, June 6th, 2014

Change ManagementChange is the Only Constant

Change is upon us, and we no longer doubt that it has become the way of life in our decade and beyond. In the real world, change occurs only when people embrace it, champion it, and have the courage to move onto uncharted paths. Successful change is about discovery and resistance, and attending to the needs of the people who are an integral element of the process.

Mentoring As Support for Change
Effective mentoring is a powerful way to address people’s needs during change, thus reducing resistance, and opening the path for the new desired future.

Mentoring Competencies That Support Growth
The ability to guide people through successful change is linked to specific mentoring competencies.

Successful mentoring relationships act as vehicles that enable people to develop the new behaviors that are necessary for change. These relationships are based on simple, but powerful principles:
• Mutual trust, developed as a result of mutual respect;
• Commitment to growth and discovery, through support and challenge;
• Openness to give and receive help and feedback;
• Commitment to action and results, the ability to make it happen.

Examples of Mentoring Help during Change

Each phase of transition offers different mentoring challenges. The following examples illustrate how mentoring behaviors can be tailored to meet specific needs.

Phase 1. Optimism
Early in the change process people may have an unrealistic view of what is required. Mentoring can provide a direction that keeps people on an even keel, and helps them understand the full impact of what is needed during change.
The mentor accomplishes this by asking good questions that help people identify their individual reactions to the change. This questioning process looks at both positive and negative aspects of the change, and helps identify future needs. By also sharing his/her own experiences with change, the mentor makes the change experience real and possible. (more…)

Training Success Story: Leadership at Lunchtime

Friday, May 16th, 2014

Leadership Training CoursesThe Problem: A mid-sized community bank with 200 busy employees needed training that would inspire creative thinking about leadership, build strong teams, and be finished in the course of a two-hour lunch workshop.

The Solution: Provide a variety of CRM training videos that motivate and connect by showing real people in everyday work situations, including Teamwork in Crisis, Leaders of Character: Leadership – The West Point Way, and Taking Charge of Change. Customize each course to provide just the right amount of material necessary for a truly meaningful Lunchtime Learning session.

The Success Story: For some employees, combining a hard-earned lunch hour with a leadership lecture wasn’t initially palatable. But once the monthly Lunchtime Learning sessions started rolling, the voluntary classes filled quickly and latecomers were being turned away at the door. These segments are now very much looked forward to, combining reward and recognition with practical, memorable training ideas.

Initially, segments of videos were shown in order to fit the allotted time frame. As the popularity of lunchtime training grew, the bank expanded on some of the themes and took them company wide. For example, Taking Charge of Change was initially formatted for the Lunchtime Learning workshop and became the foundation resource for a longer training session for all bank employees. Using the Leader’s Guide as a backup to the lesson plan, the company was able to custom design programs that engaged employees at many levels.

In addition, training leaders report positive feedback from managers at all levels who have taken bits of the training, including the ice-breaker and skill set activities, to their own staff meetings and inter-departmental planning sessions.

One training leader praised CRM Learning video materials for providing rich content in a concise format, and said “I find these programs give our instructors an array of valuable topics to cover, with a minimal amount of preparation and development time.’’

Accelerating the Possibility Curve

Tuesday, September 24th, 2013

By Dewitt Jones

It’s 8am in the middle of the Sacramento National Wildlife Refuge. I’ve been photographing snow geese since long before dawn.  Thousands stop here on their yearly migration and, until an hour ago, the morning sky had been crowded with them. Now, however, the sky is empty.

“They’ll bed down right after dawn and won’t get up for anything after that,” the Ranger had told me, “‘About the only thing that frightens them once they’re down is a low flying plane and we don’t get many of those around here.”

Well, they were sure “down” now. I could hear them all squawking somewhere over the corn rows in front of me. A good bit of hiking and I found them, thousands of them, in a tiny lake in the middle of the reserve.

I set up my long lens and waited.  An hour.  Not one flew.  Another hour.  Nope, they certainly were “down.”

In the heat of the morning, my mind began to wander. Strangely, looking at that empty sky and the immovable snow geese, I found myself thinking about the nature of change. In so many areas of our lives, we simply don’t want it. None of us want to get older, or face a new onslaught of IRS regulations, or like having our favorite TV series dumped unceremoniously from the airways. (more…)

10 Steps to Surviving Change – Elegantly

Monday, August 23rd, 2010

By Sarah Steele
If I say the word CHANGE, how do you feel? Most people remain fearful, anxious and uncomfortable with change, despite it being a driving issue in our society. It appears that no matter how much experience we have it doesn’t get any easier.

Gaining a level of understanding that allows you to be productive, creative and flexible with your own life as well as helping others handle change is key to succeeding in today’s ever-changing world.

Follow these 10 steps to help you cope with the transitions in your life:

1. Recognize that things DO change
Nothing is forever. Neither the good, nor the bad. You will be much less frustrated if you accept the change and decide to manage it, rather than desperately try and cling onto the way things used to be.

2. Pinpoint the specific change you are going through
Because any change has a number of implications in different areas of our lives, we tend to generalize the change we are going through. Stay focused on one aspect of the change by identifying what you are most afraid of losing as a result of this change and then understanding why that loss is uncomfortable. For example, a new computer system may mean you will no longer feel competent. Feeling incompetent is a very different issue than fighting new technology, and can be easily addressed with training.

3. Accept the loss factor
Admit to yourself that regardless of whether or not you experience this particular change as good or bad, there will be a sense of loss. This is the “better the devil you know scenario” that leads us to put up with a situation we know isn’t good for us. Clearly define the change and recognize the areas of your life that will not change as a result.

4. Seek valid information
You will doubt the facts and struggle to believe anything you hear, see or feel about the change. Write down what information you need to know and who can provide you with that data. Ask straight questions, remain open to views that may be different to your own and listen to what you are being told.

5. Take action
Now that you have information, kick-start some forward momentum by taking both physical and mental action. Focus on taking the first baby step by setting priorities, committing to someone else what you will achieve and by when, and exercise (even if it’s only a 15 minute walk each day).

6. Recognize the Danger Zone
There comes a point where we choose to move on with the change and discover the opportunities it brings, or to give in to the fear of the unknown and remain fearful, anxious and in denial. Recognize that this normal, and don’t allow yourself to succumb. Increasing your small, regular action steps will help you keep that forward momentum going.

7. Make a decision
All the information you gathered may seem overwhelming. To avoid analysis paralysis set yourself a deadline for making a decision and do whatever it takes – even if you resort to flipping a coin! The secret to this is to break big decisions down into small, bite-sized chunks and work on one at a time. This way, decisions are easily reversible.

8. Identify the benefits
All change has some benefits. A divorce can give us the opportunity to have control of the remote, a new job could teach us new skills and starting your own business can provide you with the chance to follow your passion. Understand what the benefits of the change are and recognize them for the great gifts they bring you.

9. Change? What change?
I promise there will come a time when you stop looking at the change as something different. You will have integrated its challenges and victories into your life and will now feel more stable and open to what the future may hold. Remember everything you have learned for the next exciting, exhilarating and, oh ok, scary change.

10. Identify a change partner
Change is a constant in today’s society that you will go through many times in many different situations. Finding a change partner who is committed to encouraging you and supporting you will make the whole experience less scary and probably speedier. This may be a coach who can remain dispassionate, hold the mirror up to your fears and hold onto your highest goals. Or it might be a colleague at work who can help you see both sides of a situation.

Sarah Steele is founder of Atlantic Coaching, www.atlantic.coaching.com.
Article source: http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Sarah_Steele

Training Resource: Taking Charge of Change
A rookie skydiver serves as a metaphor in this action-packed video, which helps people of all ages adapt to big changes – and thrive.

Change Icebreaker Exercise: Pulse Check on Change

Thursday, June 25th, 2009

Time: 5 minutes or 15 minutes (15 minutes if participant introductions are done in conjunction with the activity)

 

Introduce Activity/Give Instructions

1) Explain that this exercise gives people a chance to perform a quick self-check on their feelings and attitudes about change.

2) Give each participant a handout (see * below). Ask participants to check whichever box (“Negative” or “Positive”) best reflects their initial reaction to each word or phrase.  Tell them to go with their initial “gut response”, not to over think it.  If they feel neutral on a word, have them do their best to decide if their reaction is closer to the positive or to the negative side of the range.

 

*The following should appear on the handout: 

 

 

Positive  (+) 

Negative    (-) 

1       

Uncertain

 

 

2       

Postpone

 

 

3       

Impose

 

 

4       

Adapt

 

 

5       

Reorganize

 

 

6       

Opportunity

 

 

7       

Retrain

 

 

8       

Cancel

 

 

9       

Plan

 

 

10   

Shift

 

 

11   

Re-deploy

 

 

12   

Transition

 

 

13   

Ambiguous

 

 

14   

Let’s try something different!

 

 

15   

Starting from scratch

 

 

Totals:

 

 

 

 

 3)  Allow participants about 1 minute to complete the list.

  

 Debrief Exercise

4)     Instruct participants to count the number of positive and negative responses and note them in the Totals row.  Ask how many people had more negatives than positives and vice versa.  Make the following points:

·             We tend to view change either as a challenge or opportunity.

·             Even those of us with many positives have some concerns about different aspects of change.  

Participant Introductions (Optional)

Time: 10 minutes

If you would like to wrap the participant introductions into the icebreaker: 

1)     Tell the participants you’d like them to take about 30 seconds each to introduce themselves and tell the group a little about their attitude towards change. Each person should share:

 

·              Their name and department

·              The word from the Exercise they had the most positive reaction to

·              The word from the Exercise they had the most negative reaction to

Be sure to keep track of words/phrases that were mentioned the most as a negative or positive.

2)     Thank the participants for sharing their responses. Comment on the following:

·     Some words elicit both positive and negative responses

·     Some words can be one person’s most favorable and another person’s most negative.

3) Divulge which words were seen most positively, and which were perceived most negatively.  (If there is time, you can always expand on this.)

4) Summarize by saying that each person reacts differently to change — even when we are only reading or hearing words that represent change.   Change gets to our “gut” as much as it gets to our heads – and many of our strongest reactions come from there.  Reactions that arise from our “gut” are just as valid as those that arise from our heads.

     5) Transition to the next activity in your change management training session or discussion.

This material excerpted from the Leader’s Guide to the video program, Taking Charge of Change.

Need more help in this area? CRM Learning’s Taking Charge of Change video training program helps people recognize and embrace the various emotions we all experience when going through the stages of change.

 

 


 

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