Lowest Prices • Free Ground Shipping Call Us! 800-421-0833 Watchlist  Watch Later Help   |   cart My Cart 
(0)
  |     |   Mobile Site

X
Your cart is currently empty.

Your watchlist is currently empty.

Once & For All: Stopping Sexual Harassment at Work

Archive for the ‘Training Resources’ Category

What Do We Do Now? Multi-application Case Study

Thursday, May 2nd, 2013

Team Building TrainingInstruct participants to read the case study on the Handout, then to work with a partner for 2-3 minutes to generate ideas related to the questions. After giving them a period of time complete the questions, ask for brief suggestions for a course of action, allowing at least one response to be offered by each partner-pair.

Customize the handout below with the various questions provided, according to your training topic (communication, leadership, teamwork, problem-solving, etc.). (more…)

Building Blocks of Respect and Collaboration- Group Activity

Wednesday, September 26th, 2012

Have participants list the names of five people they don’t know well in the organization. Based on what they DO know about each of them, ask participants to write what they think each person’s unique background might be and what that perspective might bring to the table if they worked together on a hypothetical project. (more…)

Diversity Scavenger Hunt: Free Activity

Friday, September 30th, 2011

Instructions to the Trainer: Put the following questions on an 8 ½ x 11 sheet of paper. Make enough copies for everyone. Tell the group they have 10 minutes to complete this exercise.

Group Instructions: Attempt to fill in your sheet by finding a person who can say “yes” or can respond appropriately to each question. Write their first name in the space provided. You may use each person’s name only once. (more…)

Activity for Leaders: Planning & Failure

Thursday, May 19th, 2011

Background

Planning for every eventuality is one of the leadership factors taught at West Point. While it might sound contradictory, the best planning allows the greatest flexibility. No plan survives contact with the “enemy”— whatever form the “enemy” takes — be it time, budgets, competitors, or changing conditions. Planning for all contingencies establishes the competitive edge.

Communication and planning go hand in hand. A plan is only as good as the leader’s ability to communicate it to the team, and to receive information from the team as to whether or not things are going according to plan.

Also, learning from Failure is a key skill that must be understood and mastered by the cadets at West Point. (more…)

Stress Management Training Session Discussion Starters

Monday, April 4th, 2011

Here are some discussion questions to use when facilitating a session on stress management:

1.  When you say “I’m stressed out” or “I’m under a great deal of stress”, what do you mean?  What is the difference between stress and a stressor? (more…)

Don’t Assume Your Managers Are Addressing Problem Behavior: Free Activity

Wednesday, February 16th, 2011

For most supervisors and managers, having to discipline employees is the worst part of their jobs. It is an uncomfortable process they would rather avoid. And unfortunately, many do avoid it, to everyone’s disadvantage: theirs, the organization’s and the employee’s. Or, some managers act emotionally when disciplinary problems arise. But either reaction creates more problems than it solves. (more…)

Activity: From Conflict to Collaboration

Friday, September 17th, 2010

In solving conflicts, one of the best things you can do is to strive for collaboration. When collaborating, each person in the conflict works to uncover the other person’s underlying concerns so that everyone understands what is really behind the conflict and the resolution can address most (if not all) of both parties’ concerns.

Common communication tools used in collaboration are: active listening, questioning that reveals a willingness to understand (such as “What is it about this situation that bothers you the most?”), expressing your own concerns without being overly emotional, sticking to the issue at hand and taking responsibility for your role in the conflict.

Here is a quick role play activity you can use to help people practice using collaboration as a conflict resolution method.

Group Activity: Collaborating (35 minutes)

1) Before the exercise, prepare envelopes for each pair of participants. On the outside of the envelope, write a conflict situation that could conceivably occur within an organization (or within your organization, specifically). Inside the envelope, place two slips of paper. On Slip #1, list a job description for Employee #1, as well as an underlying concern for them in the conflict. On Slip #2, list a job description for Employee #2, as well as an underlying concern for them in the conflict.

2) Remind the participants that the skills of active listening and open communication play a key role in helping to uncover underlying concerns in a conflict.

3) State that the goal of the role playing exercise is to get the other party to move past his or her position, and into collaboration. To achieve that, they will need to discover the concerns that are fueling the conflict.

4) Ask the participants to pair up for the role playing exercise. Then pass out the envelopes that you have prepared ahead of the session. Before they begin, ask them to reflect on their positions. They should think about the level of assertiveness they need to bring in defending their position and how willing they will be to cooperate when it comes to meeting the other person’s needs.

5) Have the group begin the role playing exercise. Set a time limit of 15 minutes.

6) After the role playing is completed, ask the group to discuss their experiences. Were they able to identify the position of the other party? Were they able to reveal the underlying concerns? How? Were they successful in moving toward a collaboration? Why or why not?

Excerpted from the Leader’s Guide for the CRM Learning video, Dealing With Conflict.

Training Resource: Dealing with Conflict shows why “collaboration” – which includes getting to the heart of what’s most important to the other party — is typically your best conflict resolution strategy.

Activity: Open- or Closed-Leadership Style?

Wednesday, August 25th, 2010

(25 MINUTES)

1.) Make copies of the Worksheet below and distribute to the participants.

2.) Ask them to list ten attributes of a leader or manager in their organization. List both what they feel are “good” and “bad” attributes as well as those they may consider neutral. As an option, if participants are from a single organization or department, you may direct them to evaluate the same leader or a manager. Or, if desired, they may use this exercise to evaluate their own leadership style or that of their own manager.

3.) When completed, have the participants put a checkmark in the circle by the left of those attributes that characterize an open-leadership style that includes free discussion, non-judgmental attitudes, and acceptance of divergent thinking. Have them put a checkmark in the box to the right by those attributes that characterize a closed-leadership style, one that includes tightly-controlled discussion, highly-defensive posturing and lack of tolerance of divergent thinking in favor of consensus.

4.) Total up the number of checkmarks on the left and give ten (10) points for each, but give minus ten (-10) points for each checkmark on the right. Add, or subtract, to reach your final score. Note that neither a completely open– nor closed-leadership style is ideal. A score of –40 to –100 indicates a highly closed-leadership style which may inhibit all but the most aggressive group members from expressing their true feelings. A score of –20 to –40 indicates a moderately closed-leadership style which may be conducive to rapid decision making, but may leave the group susceptible to the effects of groupthink. A score of +40 to +100 indicates a highly open-leadership style, which may be ineffective, because without direction from the leader, the group may be unable to reach decisions at all. An ideal score would be +20 to +40 indicating a moderately open-leadership style, which may be effective in reducing the effects of groupthink.


Leadership Style – WORKSHEET

The leader’s style can have a lot to do with how group decision-making is conducted and, therefore, whether there is a likelihood that groupthink can gain a foothold or not. In the box below, list ten characteristics, both positive and negative, of a leader or manager in your organization. As an option you may use this exercise to evaluate your own leadership style.

When completed, put a checkmark in the Ο by the left of those attributes that are open, such as “allows free discussion”, “has non-judgmental attitude”, or “loves to brainstorm”. Put a checkmark in the � to the right of those attributes that are closed, such as “tightly controls discussion” or “defends his/her ideas vigorously”.

 Attributes of _____________’s Leadership Style

Ο __________________________________________ □

Ο __________________________________________ □

Ο __________________________________________ □

Ο __________________________________________ □

Ο __________________________________________ □

Ο __________________________________________ □

Ο __________________________________________ □

Ο __________________________________________ □

Ο __________________________________________ □

Ο __________________________________________ □


SCORING
: Total up the number of checks on the left and give ten (10) points for each, but give minus ten (-10) points for each checkmark on the right. Add, or subtract, to reach your final score. Note that neither a completely open-nor closed leadership style is ideal. A score of –40 to –100 indicates a highly closed-leadership style which may inhibit all but the most aggressive group members from expressing their true feelings. A score of –20 to –40 indicates a moderately closed-leadership style which may be conducive to rapid decision making, by may leave the group susceptible to the effects of groupthink. A score of +40 to +100 indicates highly open-leadership style which maybe ineffective because without direction from the leader, the group may be unable to reach decisions at all. An ideal score would be +20 to +40 indicating a moderately open-leadership style which may be effective in reducing the effects of groupthink.

Excerpted from the Leader’s Guide for the video program Groupthink.

Training Resource: CRM Learning’s best-selling program, Groupthink, shows how bad decisions can be made when teams fail to fully discuss potential risks.

Lessons in Becoming a Virtual Virtuoso

Thursday, June 3rd, 2010

With learning budgets still being squeezed, more and more organizations are adopting the virtual classroom as ‘business as usual’. Properly facilitated, the virtual classroom can be an engaging, comfortable and accountable learning environment – a far-cry from the passive, one-way haven multitaskers have learned to love. Here are six lessons to ensure your virtual facilitation success.

Do a different kind of homework.
The virtual classroom has a different kind of energy that requires your attention before you start.  Because participants can’t see each other and “catch” each other’s enthusiasm, it’s up to you to set a positive high energy tone from the very start. Develop a ritual to focus and energize yourself a few minutes before your session takes off.

Pull up an easy chair.
The social connecting and rapport-building that makes people comfortable in the face-to-face classroom won’t happen here without some prompting. Take the extra effort to make personal connections with and between participants. Create comfort by outlining clear expectations for how to participate and the role you will play in encouraging involvement.

Add some pop to your talk.
The energy you project will be reflected back to you by participants…good, bad or ugly. Think of your voice as your energy instrument with infinite range of tone, inflection and pace. Use your voice to make up for energy lost through the absence of body language and facial expression.

Get everyone talking.
The natural turn-taking that occurs in face-to-face discussions is compromised virtually. The visual cues are missing. Open questions directed to the whole group may generate silence not because participants are disinterested but because they are waiting for someone else to take his or her turn. Let people know how you want them to respond and call on people by name generously.

Dish out the details.
When participants are confused about what they are to do in the virtual world, you can’t walk over casually to clarify. Clear, specific directions are even more critical in this venue – with visual support through slides and ‘print-your-own’ style handouts.

Fend off awkward moments.
Awkward moments – like consistent latecomers, off-base comments or negativity – magnify in the virtual classroom. Work diligently to keep things focused and to turn glimpses of negativity into positive problem solving. Minimize attention to latecomers – why take valuable time from those who arrived on time? Try even a few of these virtual virtuoso lessons and enjoy the beautiful learning you and your participants will create together.

Written by DesignArounds, your one-stop learning and development partner. © 2010. For more information about DesignArounds’ products & services, visit us at www.designarounds.com.

Need more help in this area? Our program, The Invisible Meeting, offers additional tips for achieving success in the “virtual world”. It illustrates six techniques that that turn a conference call into a productive, collaborative group session.


 

close X
For Federal Government Customers:
CRM Learning is a division of Media Partners Corporation and all government orders are invoiced by Media Partners.

Media Partners is registered with SAM.
Cage Code: 3Q5F1, Status: Active, Expiration 01/20/2021

Too busy to preview today?
Put products in this Watch Later queue so they're easy to recall next time you visit.

Make sure you're logged in when you put videos in the queue!
Log in now.
If you don't yet have a preview account, create a limited or unlimited access account.