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Once & For All: Stopping Sexual Harassment at Work

Archive for the ‘Management & Supervision’ Category

Infographic: Is Good Enough?

Thursday, May 4th, 2017

Infographic: Is Good EnoughConsidering the number of things people have to do on any given day, most are happy if they get things right 90% of the time.  But is that really enough? Especially when it comes to how we do our jobs?

If we’re right 99% of the time…or even if we’re right 99.9% of the time…what about the people who are negatively impacted by the .1% – 1% of the time we’ve made a mistake?

This infographic cites examples that will help people rethink quality guidelines and renew their commitment to giving their best at all times. Feel free to share it with your employees.

This graphic’s content is from the popular meeting opener, Is Good Enough? Click here for product information and to preview the video.

9 Essential Supervisory Skills

Friday, June 24th, 2016

Every workplace needs strong supervisory skills, and CRM Learning offers the best supervisor training videos at low cost. Train your supervisors using the nine essential supervisory skills featured in our supervisor training video, “After All, You’re the Supervisor.”

After All, You're the Supervisor imageUsing the scenario of Alec, a recently-promoted Customer Service Representative now asked to lead his previous co-workers, the video teaches nine skills your supervisors need to manage subordinates effectively and efficiently.

1. Acknowledge Your New Role

Having been a superior customer service representative, when Alec is promoted to supervisor, he struggles a bit moving from friend and colleague to “boss.” Alec learns that new responsibilities are required in this role along with a new level of authority. The hard part for many new supervisors like Alec is acknowledging that in order to be effective, you must change the way you interact with your team members.

  1. Plan and Prioritize

In order to be successful, Alec will need to plan and prioritize his – and his team’s – responsibilities and tasks. This includes listing tasks and generating a plan for how to get things accomplished on time. Inevitably, this process will also include delegating tasks to others, which Alec also learns in a later skill point.

  1. Be Accessible

Every great supervisor makes themselves accessible to their employees. Alec learns that this can take the form of an open door, walking around the department, having regular meetings with team members, or learning to take advantage of spontaneous “coachable moments” when you see them.

  1. Encourage Teamwork

Alec quickly realizes that he is no longer an “individual contributor.” Creating a well-functioning team is part of his new job. Encouraging teamwork enables supervisors to go further in accomplishing departmental and company objectives.  It also helps create great team cohesion and high morale. High performance teamwork is achieved by ensuring that your team is comprised of diverse individuals with a range of complementary skills and then fully utilizing those skills. By fostering cooperation rather than competition within your team, and by modeling good teamwork behaviors yourself, you will see team results soar.

  1. Communicate Upward AND Downward

An efficient supervisor communicates effectively both “upwards” to his or her manager and “downwards” to his subordinates.  Downward communication is the process of communicating the direction, philosophy, goals, and values of the company to the team. It also applies to changes communicated to the team, and if done correctly, helps them buy-in to decisions that affect them. Alec employs upward communication when he shares his team’s concerns over a software update with his boss and keeps her informed of how the “front line workers” are using the software.

  1. Delegate

Supervisors need to delegate tasks to their team in order to effectively supervise. No supervisor can do all the work on their own, so Alec learns to consider his team member’s strengths as he evaluates who should be assigned which tasks. He also learns that following up on the tasks you delegate allows you to ensure their completion, support your team members, and uncover and resolve problems. 

  1. Discipline Effectively

For a brand-new supervisor like Alec, effective discipline is perhaps the most difficult thing to learn, especially when you are disciplining the person you were sitting next to last week. Alec must discipline a coworker, Libby, who repeatedly returns late from lunch. In doing so, he learns that effective discipline places the responsibility for the problem and the solution on the employee, rather than him, and that effective discipline provides for a positive outcome rather than a punitive one.

  1. Provide Feedback

As important as it is to discipline your people effectively and give constructive feedback, it is equally important to recognize when they are doing a good job, and praise or reward them for that performance. Alec gets practice giving constructive feedback to a coworker who slightly missed the mark on an assignment, and later gives genuine and specific praise to that team member when he does a better job.

  1. Model the Way

Perhaps the most effective way to modify team culture is by modeling the behaviors and attitudes you want to see in the team. No matter how much you tell your people how you want them to behave, unless you show it yourself, it won’t have much effect. Model behaviors such as respect, punctuality, attitude, conflict resolution, and in Alec’s case, good customer service and pitching in to help out a different team.

These nine essential supervisory skills are a well-rounded introduction into the basics of supervising. Let Alec and his team teach your new supervisors how to manage others effectively with After All, You’re the Supervisor.

CRM Learning offers the best supervisor training videos on the market. Visit our website and browse all of our supervisor training topics.

The Manager’s Role in Preventing Workplace Bullying

Wednesday, May 18th, 2016

bullying imageWorkplace bullying training is extremely important for managers and supervisors. Did you know that 50% of the U.S. workforce reports witnessing or having first-hand experience with bullying in the workplace? In fact, workplace bullying is more prevalent than illegal harassment. This management training topic – how to prevent bullying at work – is essential for employee morale and preventing a hostile work environment.  


What is bullying?

“By definition, bullying is persistent, offensive, intimidating, or insulting behavior that makes the recipient feel upset, threatened, humiliated, or vulnerable. Without intervention, bullies generally do not accept responsibility for their behavior; they are unable or unwilling to recognize the effect of their behavior on other people.”- CRM Learning’s Preventing Workplace Bullying training video

Bullying can happen in any size organization, in any department, and to anyone – subordinates, managers, men, women, young and old. Awareness is key, and it is everyone’s responsibility to prevent it. Prevention starts with each and every employee being aware of exactly what constitutes bullying, and knowing how to speak up for themselves and others. It means creating a culture that doesn’t tolerate bully behavior from anyone.

CRM Learning offers the best workplace bullying training videos on the market. Our “Preventing Workplace Bullying” video has been successful in training managers and employees who wish to improve their work environments. The video covers four skills, and features realistic workplace vignettes that take place in office, education, healthcare, and industrial settings.

1. Recognize Bully Behavior

The first step to preventing bullying is to recognize the behavior. Bullying comes in many forms and can often be mistaken for other types of behavior. It’s important to know what behavior “crosses the line” and fits the definition of bullying.

2. Speak up for Yourself

Looking out for yourself and your well-being is appropriate if you are being bullied in the workplace.  Everyone should know how to respond to bullying so they have a better chance of nipping the behavior in the bud. It’s important to be confident and share facts and feelings when speaking up to a bully.

3. Stand up for Others

If you witness bullying, it is your responsibility to stand up for the target of the bullying behavior. State your observations and share your concerns with the appropriate people. Explain how the negative behavior is affecting the employee and others.

4. Commit to Next Steps

Document actions taken and responses to speaking up to a bully. If necessary, make a formal complaint. Every organization should ensure that employees know what the organization’s bullying policy is and who in management or HR they should talk to if they have a complaint. 

Left unsettled, bullying in the workplace can lead to emotional distress and reduced productivity. Make sure all managers are equipped to handle bullying in their departments by providing bullying prevention training.

Preventing Workplace Bullying: How to Recognize and Respond to Bullies at Work depicts common bullying situations in a manner that encourages rich discussion. The accompanying Manager’s Module gives leaders additional instruction on bullying behaviors and the damage they cause. Leaders are taught to address bullying when they observe it and – because workplace bullies are frequently in a supervisory or management role – they are given a checklist of things that let them evaluate their own behaviors.

Visit CRM Learning’s website to learn more about management training topics and how they can help your company.

10 Important Management Training Topics to Improve Efficiency and Productivity in the Workplace

Wednesday, March 9th, 2016

Maggie_Chr_Alison_Step1Management and supervisory skills are essential in the workplace. There are many ways to improve effectiveness in this field. CRM Learning is proud to offer outstanding videos that cover key management and supervisory skills and competencies, including: what it means to be a respectful supervisor, how to interview, review performance and terminate, and how to make sure you are the kind of boss people want to work for.

The 10 management training topics below are guaranteed to help improve morale, efficiency and productivity in the workplace.

Building Trust and Respect

Gaining the trust and respect of team members is crucial. The stronger the trust foundation you have, the more successful your management strategies will be. L.E.A.D. with Integrity and Leadership: What’s Trust Got to Do with It? are two training videos that teach specific things managers can do to build trust and respect.

Coaching

Coaching is a proven tool for maximizing employee satisfaction and productivity. With the proper training, managers and supervisors see that coaching is all about taking an active role in employee performance, including recognizing what employees are doing well and addressing situations where an employee is falling short. The Practical Coach and Coaching and Counseling provide excellent information in this area.  

Communication Skills

When it comes to managerial success, the importance of communication can not be overstated. Managers must communicate regularly with employees, know how to give feedback constuctively and be able to listen effectively.  It’s also helpful to have communication skills that enable you to inspire and motivate others.  The video Communication Counts shows managers how to circumvent common communication blunders. Tell Me a Story shows how storytelling takes communication to a level where leaders are better able to connect with and energize employees.

Employee Retention

Employee retention is a reflection on management. Every employer wishes for a high employee retention rate, but even those with the best of intentions can unwittingly drive away good employees. Many factors come into play when it comes to engaging employees and making them feel valued; CRM Learning’s video The Respectful Supervisor: Motivating and Retaining Employees covers 5 of the most important.  Keeping the Good Ones is another excellent video on the topic.

Interviewing and Hiring

Interviewing and hiring is equally  difficult for both parties involved. In a management position, you are often faced with many great candidates, having to make decisions that are best for your company. Capability, commitment and chemistry and three important factors in the hiring process. The Three Dimensional Interview training video teaches management what to look for when interviewing potential employees.

Managing Meetings

Meetings are a useful method for gathering employee input and addressing topics that affect the entire team. But in order to be effective, meetings have to be well run.  The Invisible Meeting demonstrates how to stay on track and maintain productivity in meetings even when some or all of the team members are “attending” virtually.

Motivating and Encouraging Employees

Worker productivity and job satisfaction rise when people know their work makes a difference. Would I Inspire Me? gives leaders practical ways to motivate others and make employees’ work life more rewarding.  Included among the desired managerial behaviors are communicating the “why” behind what you are asking people to do and providing meaningful rewards and recognition when a job is done well.

Performance Improvement Appraisals

Discussing performance issues can be difficult for a manager. But, with the proper training, managers learn that there are positive ways to approach these discussions, even when the employee’s performance is not where it needs to be.  Keeping performance discussions positive and making employees responsible for improving their performance will produce the best results.  Positive Discipline demonstrates a highly effective 5-step process.

Project Planning and Delegating

Ensuring that all the work that needs to get done actually gets done is a big part of the manager’s job.  Managers need to know when and how to delegate, and be willing to hold people accountable for doing what they say they will do.  After All You’re the Supervisor shows how one new supervisor learns the importance of planning and delegating.

If you want to improve your management and train your employees effectively, CRM Learning has everything you need. Check out all of our topics for management and supervision.

Using Teamwork Videos to Foster Productivity and Improve Results

Wednesday, November 25th, 2015

Bringing your company’s mission and purpose to fruition requires more than the individual efforts of star employees. Teamwork is absolutely essential to any organization’s long-term success. However, issues with communication and interpersonal dynamics can create obstacles that keep groups from working well together. Teamwork videos help your employees overcome these obstacles and create highly functioning teams.

Using Team Building Videos to Foster Productivity and Improve Results

Through compelling examples and proven instructional models, teamwork videos can help  teams overcome obstacles while expanding their capacity for collaboration, innovation and execution. You can use videos to improve team performance in these crucial areas:

  • Communication: When team members are unable or unwilling to communicate effectively, it is nearly impossible for the team as a whole to function properly. Barriers to team communication can include personality conflicts, lack of trust, disrespect, and false consensus (where people are reluctant to express an opposing opinion). Many popular team building videos address these issues while providing information on how to keep group communication honest, respectful, positive and productive.
  • Achieving Goals: In the workplace, teams are generally created for a specific purpose. Empowering teams to set goals helps individual team members work beyond their own personal agendas while keeping everyone focused on the task at hand. When goals are unclear or group members aren’t sure of how the part they play contributes to the overall team objective, accountability suffers and the team becomes ineffective. Teach your teams how to set realistic goals, gain everyone’s commitment to those goals and track performance with videos that provide team training in these areas.
  • Solving Problems: Even the best of teams will occasionally hit an obstacle. How a group overcomes such obstacles can determine the degree to which they will be successful over time. Some of the best teamwork videos available are those that provide inspiration and instruction in this area. Highly recommended are videos that tell true stories of remarkable team accomplishments, such as the team that worked tirelessly to overcome setbacks and save 33 miners trapped underground in Chile…or the team that helped a blind mountain climber reach the summit of Mt. Everest.  
  • Leadership: Without great leadership, groups may be able to get some things done…but it is unlikely that they will really become a “team” in the truest sense of the word.  The right kind of leader helps unify the group and ensures that all voices are heard.  He or she keeps the team on course, nips conflict in the bud, and celebrates victories along the way. Using teamwork videos specifically designed for teaching people how to build and lead a high-performing team will set both the designated team leader and the team itself up for success.

Why Use Videos?

Using videos as a medium for teamwork training offers some notable benefits.

  • It is important for each member of a team to receive the same training information as every other person in the group. Video training provides this kind of uniform experience.
  • Teamwork videos engage employees through both sight and sound, helping them retain more information than through written or audio training alone.
  • Finally, many teamwork videos profile real-world teams comprised of ordinary people who’ve accomplished extraordinary things by working together. This provides a highly effective form of motivation.

Teamwork videos are essential training resources for any employer interested in creating teams that excel in productivity and leadership.

Recommended Training Resources: The 5 Dysfunctions of a Team, based on the best-selling book by Patrick Lencioni, helps teams overcome the most common barriers to peak performance.  And, Everest, a documentary account of the amazing team that enabled blind mountain climber Erik  Weihenmayer to reach the summit of Mt. Everest.

Managers Must Manage Themselves First

Thursday, August 13th, 2015

If you ask people to share a piece of life-changing advice they’ve received from a manager, you might hear a few noteworthy pearls of wisdom. However, you are more likely to find that what typically sticks with someone is not the particular pieces of information that were shared, but how a manager presented the advice. 103

Here’s why. A manager’s ability to influence employees is, first and foremost, related to the manager’s ability to manage him or herself. Managers often botch “teachable moments” because their message is mixed with an expression of anger or frustration. When messages are delivered in this manner, without consideration for the individual and the situation, it can create the opposite of the desired effect. (more…)

Knowledge Transfer: Why it’s important, and how it’s done

Monday, June 29th, 2015

“It’s easier to just do it myself.” Have you ever heard that said? And be honest: have you ever said it?

It can feel true. Teaching what you know takes time and energy that are hard to spare from the everyday demands of your job. And teaching what you know isn’t part of most people’s job descriptions. So why not just do it (whatever “it” is) yourself, rather than teaching someone else?

There are many reasons – and here are three questions to consider if you’ve been saying “it’s easier to do it myself.” (more…)

The Timeless Wisdom of the “Abilene Paradox”

Wednesday, September 24th, 2014

Abilene Paradox Training VideoWhat do a 104-degree Texas afternoon, a game of dominoes, and a cafeteria have to do with making good workplace decisions?

In his classic article, “The Abilene Paradox,” professor Jerry Harvey tells the story of his family’s decision to drive their ’58 Buick – with no air conditioning – 53 miles to Abilene for supper.

When they returned home several hours later, hot and exhausted, it turned out that none of them really wanted to make the trip. Each family member revealed that they would have strongly preferred to stay home and play dominoes. As professor Harvey describes the situation:  “Here we were, four reasonably sensible people who, of our own volition, had just taken a 106-mile trip across a godforsaken desert in a furnace-like temperature, through a cloud-like dust storm, to eat unpalatable food at a hole-in-the-wall cafeteria in Abilene, when none of us had really wanted to go.  The whole situation simply didn’t make sense.” (more…)

5 Tips for Employee Engagement and Retention

Friday, September 12th, 2014

Bob_computerWhen it comes to retaining and motivating your best, most highly-skilled workers, here are five important things to remember:

People want to work in a positive, supportive atmosphere.  Leaders set the tone by communicating well and being available to support problem solving.

People want to grow and be challenged.  Leaders can support employees’ attempts to keep learning and broadening their skills, and can mindfully assign challenging tasks.

People are motivated by different things, not just financial compensation.  Leaders can become more aware of what encourages each individual to achieve his or her best. (more…)


 

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