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Archive for the ‘Leadership’ Category

These 5 Leadership Training Areas Help You Take Managers From Good to Great

Wednesday, November 18th, 2015

When you promote an employee to manager or supervisor, you’re providing an opportunity for greater rewards and responsibility. To be successful, your new managers need to refine their leadership skills. CRM Learning offers videos that cover the leadership training topics your management team needs in order to be effective. Here are 5 specific training areas that can provide a positive impact in your workplace.

5 Leadership Training Areas that Help Take Managers From Good to Great

  1. Communication Skills: The best leaders are first-rate communicators. Through their words, they motivate and inspire others, build accountability, and establish relationships that bring out the best in people. Managers who strive to be great leaders must learn to speak in a clear and effective manner, ask the right questions, and know when and how to listen. Recommended Training Resource: The Respectful Supervisor: Motivating and Retaining Employees
  2. Influencing & Negotiation Skills: Because managers typically oversee projects as well as people, they will be more successful if they know how to influence and negotiate with the people around them. These skills ensure that the work gets done and goals are met….without compromising relationships. Recommended Training Resource: Leading the Way: Negotiating with Influence
  3. Leadership Accountability: Managers play a key role in creating and maintaining an accountable workplace. Teach them how to hold themselves and others accountable and you will reduce unproductive behavior while improving employee engagement and results. Recommended Training Resource: Accountability That Works!
  4. Mentoring & Coaching: Both formal and informal mentoring are essential for knowledge transfer and succession planning. Show your managers that coaching and mentoring are something they should both give and receive; then, be sure to support these efforts at the organizational level.  Widespread use of mentoring and coaching ensures that everyone receives ongoing encouragement while benefitting from the practical experience of others.Recommended Training Resource: Insights to Better Mentoring.
  5. Problem Solving & Decision Making: The ability to solve problems and make decisions is crucial for managers at all levels. Great leaders have the ability to step back and view problems from a broader perspective — often uncovering root causes instead of simply “putting out fires.” Educate your leaders on the things that derail group dynamics and provide them with collaboration tools that help them work with their teams to find effective solutions and make better decisions. Recommended Training Resources: 5 Questions Every Leader Must Ask

Making an investment in leadership training allows you to develop leaders that will set your organization up for long-term success. By covering these five important training areas, you will improve the performance of your managers and the employees who report to them.

10 Guidelines for Ethical Leadership

Monday, June 8th, 2015

If you have the responsibility of leading and influencing others, it’s important that you remain aware of the impact you have on them in the area of integrity and ethics. Employees who see ethical behavior modeled by their manager or supervisor are more likely to act in kind. Additionally, employees who rate their leader as “ethical” typically have greater job satisfaction and higher levels of commitment.Ethics 4 Everyone video

Here are 10 guidelines for ethical leadership, along with corresponding action steps to help you put the guidelines into practice: (more…)

Why Transparency Matters

Tuesday, May 12th, 2015

Alcon_group1Transparency in business – it’s become quite the buzzword. And like all buzzwords, it’s easy to think of it as just another fad. It’s also easy for an organization to pay lip service to the idea without ever following through. But transparency is important for everyone: employees, leaders, customers, and — for publicly-held companies — stockholders.

Here’s how it impacts each group.

1. Employees
When employees are clear about the “why” behind their assigned projects and tasks, they’re much more prepared to do what needs to be done – which could include them making suggestions for improvements that would otherwise never have been imagined, simply because there wasn’t enough information available.
Educate every employee about the importance and relevance of what they’re asked to do, and you’ll have a more motivated, thoughtful, and productive workforce. Keep them in the dark, and you’re inviting mistakes, lackadaisical performance, and disengagement.
(more…)

Unspoken Feedback

Wednesday, October 15th, 2014

Leadership TrainingEver wonder what your employees are thinking about you?

If so, you’re probably a better-than-average leader who takes the time to observe body language, facial expressions, and tone of voice, so you can tell when someone’s frustrated, confused, or just plain upset about something that’s happened.

But even in the best of manager/employee relationships, you’re probably not going to get the type of  in-depth honest feedback that might help you make real changes. Even in organizations where 360-degree reviews are consistently used, feedback isn’t always timely – or completely honest.

So what’s a manager to do when s/he wants to improve?

It goes back to observation, and to caring about what your team thinks and feels.

It’s not hard to learn how people act when they’re upset, hurt, frustrated, or angry.

It’s not hard to notice when something you’ve done has triggered their reaction.

It can be hard to be honest enough with yourself to acknowledge the connection between your actions and their reactions, and to be vulnerable enough to explore how you might do things differently in the future. (more…)

6 Tell-Tale Symptoms of the Abilene Paradox

Tuesday, September 30th, 2014

Team Effectiveness TrainingIn our previous article we wrote about a humorous family “trip to Abilene” and the concept of the Abilene Paradox.  We also discussed
how the Paradox affects us in both our personal and work lives.   Today, we’ll explore six tell-tale symptoms of the Paradox.

Remember that professor Jerry Harvey described the Abilene Paradox as the inability to manage agreement rather than the inability to manage conflict.  This inability to manage agreement is the essential symptom that defines individuals and organizations caught in the web of the Abilene Paradox.

Consider this workplace scenario:

Sue, Tony, Jasmine and their manager, Chris, all have strong reservations about implementing a proposed procedural change.  Individually, each one is convinced the change will cause more problems than it will solve.  BUT, because the proposed change was suggested by a highly-paid consultant, and because no one else is voicing their concerns, each individual claims to support the plan (when they really don’t). The procedural change goes forward…seemingly with unanimous consent.  Later, when troubling operational issues surface, the  group members get annoyed with  one another and blame the consultant for giving bad advice. Eventually—despite a hefty investment in the flawed new procedure—the organization decides to go back to the old way of doing things.  Susan, Tony, Jasmine and Chris never discuss the matter again. (more…)

Cross-functional Teams: The Leader’s Role in Building Synergy

Thursday, August 21st, 2014

Cross-functional Teams: The Leader’s Role in Building SynergyOrganizations won’t be successful with a cross-functional team approach if departments within the organization have been overly isolated or are mired in an “us versus them” mindset.

What can a leader do to build synergy in these types of dysfunctional cross-functional team situations?

1. Start by making first-hand observations. Walk around the organization and ask people how things are going; seek their input on the issue at hand. Visible leadership (when employees can SEE leaders walking around and talking to folks) builds morale and lets people know that someone cares about what they’re doing and thinking.
2. Build bridges between roles and job functions. Encourage everyone to look beyond their immediate surroundings and give them opportunities to form productive working relationships with people in other departments. A beyond-the-barriers mindset ensures useful information is shared and not kept in “silos”. (more…)

Are You a Hoarder?

Monday, August 4th, 2014

Leadership TrainingNo, we’re not talking about the TV show, and we don’t suspect you of secretly stockpiling paper clips – or even of having too many cats.

But you – or others in your organization – might be hoarding knowledge.

The phrase “knowledge is power”  is sometimes interpreted  as, “If I keep all the knowledge to myself, I will have power.” This is the hoarder model. It’s based on the flawed assumption that knowledge is in short supply, and that if we “give it away” by sharing what we know, we lose something.

The statement “knowledge shared is knowledge multiplied” is a more helpful approach, recognizing the reality that knowledge isn’t a “thing” that, when we give it away, we no longer have. Instead, shared knowledge increases understanding and insight.

When knowledge flows within an organization, that sends a message of trust and confidence to all employees. This alone tends to motivate and energize everyone involved. (more…)

Would I Work for Me?

Tuesday, July 1st, 2014

Leadership Training VideosBeing the boss can be challenging. Higher paychecks come with more responsibility, more pressure, and often more time spent worrying about work. This increase in stress can lead to tension in the workplace. Studies have shown that a great or bad boss is the number-one factor that influences people’s performance at work. A great boss helps people thrive, while a bad one induces people to quit or do less-than-satisfactory work.

There are several keys to being a great boss:

  • Share information
  • Get people involved
  • Listen to people’s concerns
  • Take action to show you care
  • Tell people what they’re doing right
  • Focus on solutions, not problems
  • Deal with mistakes in private
  • Use mistakes to help people

These skills improve motivation, productivity, and the bottom line. They take negatives and turn them into positives. (more…)

6 Keys to Leading in Turbulent Times

Wednesday, June 11th, 2014

Leadership Success TrainingGlobalization, talent shortages and roller coaster market dynamics are just a few of the complex challenges facing today’s businesses. So how do you lead effectively in this turbulent environment?

“Complex challenges — ranging from expanding into overseas markets to dealing with the fallout of natural disasters — often don’t respond to conventional approaches and knowledge. Instead, they require innovative thought and action,” says John Ryan, President and CEO of the Center for Creative Leadership (CCL).

Six important things you can do to become a more effective leader include:

Collaborate. Collaborative leaders can get tremendous results. Research shows that the ability to collaborate is a skill that top executives believe their men and women should have. In fact, 97 percent of the executives we surveyed identified collaboration as a key to their organization’s success. And yet, just 47 percent of those same executives believe the leaders in their organizations are skilled collaborators. (more…)


 

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