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Archive for the ‘Accountability’ Category

Infographic: 10 Things You’ll NEVER Hear from a Truly Accountable Person

Sunday, July 24th, 2016

Infographic: 10 Things You'll Never Hear From a Truly Accountable PersonAt CRM Learning we have found that some of the most impactful training an organization can do is in the area of accountability. Accountability training conveys the importance of building a culture focused on taking responsibility and keeping commitments, seeking clarity, answering for results, and learning from mistakes.

Here’s an INFOGRAPHIC that drives home the point that with proper accountability training comes accountable mindsets, and never having to hear statements like these at work ever again!

Visit our Accountability training topic page for the best accountability training videos available online.

 

Why Your Best Employees WISH You Would Provide Accountability Training

Friday, June 3rd, 2016

Accountability imageAt your organization, there is one thing your best employees are hoping for: accountability training for the whole staff. Employees who are naturally responsible hold themselves accountable for their actions, but tire of fellow workers who miss deadlines and place blame elsewhere for their failures. Your best employees know that overall performance of the team will improve when EVERY member of the team has an accountability “mindset” and does what they say they’re going to do.

CRM Learning’s best-selling “Accountability That Works” training video provides a new take on accountability training for employees at all levels of the organization. This accountability training video uses a 3-stage model to ensure that every task has a clear owner and agreement, and that employees are willing and able to hold themselves and their teammates accountable. This helps avoid finger-pointing when things go wrong, and provides you with tools to address communication issues within your team.

The Cycle of Accountability and How It Can Help Your Team

  1. The “before” phase: Responsibility – establishing a mindset of ownership before the task begins and taking complete responsibility for getting it done.
  2. The “during” phase: Empowerment– doing whatever is necessary to complete the task, including identifying action steps and timeline.
  3. The “after” phase: Accountability – owning the outcome of the task, good or bad, and learning from it.
  4. Behind it all are Clear Agreements – they are what hold the three stages together and make the cycle work effectively.

Accountability That Works will not only teach current employees how to remodel their outlook on accountability, but it will also teach new employees how to build a solid foundation of personal accountability. After employees complete this training, they are more apt to take responsibility at the outset of a task, empower themselves to complete the task, no matter the obstacles, and be accountable for their results at the end of the task. Accountability That Works will enable employees to walk away with a new set of skills for task management.

Keeping tasks moving forward requires focus, practice, and constant effort. Accountability That Works provides valuable perspective and tools to help keep tasks (and people) on track. By implementing procedures and habits that improve task focus and accountability, more conflict will be avoided, an accountability culture will be created in your organization, and results and morale will both improve. Make your best employees’ wishes come true today with accountability training from CRM Learning.

 

How to Avoid the Road to Abilene

Wednesday, January 13th, 2016

Has your group ever gone down the road to Abilene? This type of trip occurs when a group or team goes ahead with an idea or project due to the phenomenon of “false consensus”: everyone communicates their agreement with the idea, when in fact, some or all actually have objections or concerns, but fail to state them. This occurs in organizations because many people feel they’ll be ridiculed or censured if they voice objections. Trips to Abilene are a waste of time and resources and leave team members frustrated. Avoiding the road to Abilene in the first place is the best way to keep a fear of speaking up from causing your group to support a bad choice.

How to Avoid the Road to Abilene

  1. Encourage Disagreement: Create an environment in which group members are comfortable voicing differing opinions and are expected to stand up for their convictions. Facilitating discussion, keeping conflict healthy, and specifically asking for conflicting viewpoints allow groups to determine whether or not everyone is on board with a given idea.
  2. Avoid Depending on Unanimous Agreement: It takes an inordinately long time to truly reach a unanimous agreement. If people in a group know that the only way the project can move forward is if they pretend to agree with an idea, they are much less likely to present an opposing position.
  3. Create Avenues for Everyone to Voice their Opinions: No matter how you set up a discussion, not everyone is going to feel comfortable voicing their opinion. Setting up alternative avenues for discussion can help avoid that trip to Abilene. This might mean creating an anonymous suggestion box or hotline, or asking people for their opinion one on one. Everything you can do to diversify the way opinions are voiced reduces your chance of pouring resources into bad ideas.
  4. Be Careful with Language: The way a group leader constructs his or her comments can have a vast impact on whether or not members speak up. For example, saying “So we’re all in agreement?” encourages everyone in the group to say “yes.” Instead, consider asking “Does anyone have anything to add?” Being precise with language when wrapping up a discussion or responding to criticism can encourage, rather than put a damper on, opposing views.
  5. Ask “Are We On the Road to Abilene?”: If your group is familiar with the Abilene Paradox, asking straight-out whether it may be in play can help you recognize and get off of the wrong road.

Groups are most able to avoid taking the road to Abilene if they are first familiar with the concept. Video training is an effective way to introduce the Abilene Paradox and reinforce methods for avoiding it. Good training paired with thoughtful group management can dramatically cut back on ineffective group dynamics.

Recommended Training Resource: The Abilene Paradox is one of our best-selling videos. It’s an entertaining introduction to the concept of the Abilene Paradox that helps team members improve their ability to interact in groups and overcome their fear of speaking out.

5 Steps to Stop Workplace Harassment

Wednesday, October 7th, 2015

sexualharassment260Stopping sexual harassment in the workplace depends on clear policies and a change in an organization’s culture. Workplace harassment training is a critical part of maintaining a harassment-free environment. Stop harassment quickly and completely with these five steps.

5 Steps to Stop Workplace Harassment

  • Develop a Thorough and Legal Harassment Policy: Create or revise a section of your employee handbook to cover harassment policy. In today’s workplace, harassment prevention must go beyond sexual harassment, so create a policy that addresses all forms of harassment and discrimination. Make sure this policy is clearly stated to everyone in the organization. Clearly state the definition of harassment, the procedure for filing complaints, and that this type of misbehavior will not be tolerated.
  • Ensure Your Policy Includes Protocol for Reporting Complaints: Your policy should include a clear protocol for reporting complaints. This protocol should provide a way for employees to make a complaint that does not require them to include the offending party. This section of your policy is an ideal place to discuss why it is illegal to retaliate against anyone who files a complaint.
  • Conduct Policy Training on a Regular Basis: Conduct annual training sessions on your harassment policy as mandated by the laws of your state. Employees should end the training sessions with a clear understanding of your policy and should be comfortable with the procedure for reporting complaints. Supervisors and managers should undergo a separate training session to receive education on how to handle complaints. Video-based training is the most effective way to clarify what is (or is not) illegal behavior, ensuring everyone knows what behaviors to avoid and/or report.
  • Supplement Mandated Harassment Prevention Courses with General Training on Respect and Inclusion: Behaviors such as bullying and unconscious bias are unfortunately common in today’s workplace. While not illegal, these types of behaviors are every bit as damaging to employee morale and productivity as harassment. Providing general training on respect and inclusion helps employees and management identify these behaviors and take steps to end them.
  • Make a Cultural Change from the Top: Your organization’s leaders are a powerful tool in modeling harassment prevention best-practices. In addition to providing mandatory harassment prevention training for your manager, ask all of your organization’s leaders to commit to creating a respectful workplace.

Recommended Workplace Harassment Training Resources

Harassment Hurts: It’s Personal provides an overview of the different forms harassment can take, including race, sexual orientation, and sexual harassment. Insight is provided on the negative consequences of inappropriate behavior and tactics for speaking up about harassment are discussed.

Have You Got a Time Leak?

Tuesday, March 24th, 2015

Time. As the saying goes, we all get the same amount: 24 hours in each day.Kent frazzled_med

How come some people get so much done and others struggle to make the day’s priorities match up with the available hours?

We’ve identified three common causes, which we call “time leaks.”

1. Focus

You know the experience of focus: you’re immersed in what you’re doing, you look up after what feels like mere moments to discover that far more time has passed, AND you realize you’ve made monumental progress.

The time leak is lack of focus: getting coffee, chatting with colleagues, maybe even distracting yourself with Facebook or Twitter.

Become consciously aware of where your time is going, and you’ll find you can easily plug this time leak to create more focus in your day. (more…)

Taking a Stand – When you Can’t Stand Confrontation

Thursday, November 20th, 2014

Some people find confrontation, disagreement, and opinionated discussion enjoyable. They thrive on the adrenaline rush and the opportunitySpeak for Ethics to prove themselves.

Other people, though, prefer to avoid conflict and confrontation, especially in the workplace.

If you’re in the latter group, when you’re faced with a situation involving your values and ethics, it can seem as if doing what’s right and good is scary and hard.

So how can you take a stand for what you believe in, without getting embroiled in confrontations?

It’s easier than you might think, because doing what’s right starts with little things: giving credit to those who deserve it; keeping commitments to yourself and others; and demonstrating what you stand for through your everyday actions. Those around you will notice. You’ll gain a reputation for integrity. People will respect your principles.

And, in the event that standing up for what you believe in does mean challenging something another person is doing or saying:

1)      Carefully prepare your thoughts.

2)      Give your feedback tactfully and respectfully.

3)      Link your feedback to outcomes the other person understands and is committed to.

4)      Focus on the most critical issues. (more…)

Using SMART Goals Every Day

Tuesday, November 4th, 2014

Goal Setting Training VideosAre there things you know are good for you, but that you don’t always actually do?
Be honest! You know… flossing… exercising… eating more veggies… and creating SMART goals.

Yes, SMART goals: goals that are:
Specific: you know exactly what you’re going to do and why it’s important.
Measurable: you know how to tell when you’ve met the goal.
Achievable: you have (or can get) the resources needed to accomplish the goal on time
Relevant: the goal is directly related to the objectives of your job.
Timed: you know when you need to be finished.

We often assume the SMART goal process is only for big projects or for setting objectives during our annual performance review. But why not use the process even for small tasks? (more…)

6 Tell-Tale Symptoms of the Abilene Paradox

Tuesday, September 30th, 2014

Team Effectiveness TrainingIn our previous article we wrote about a humorous family “trip to Abilene” and the concept of the Abilene Paradox.  We also discussed
how the Paradox affects us in both our personal and work lives.   Today, we’ll explore six tell-tale symptoms of the Paradox.

Remember that professor Jerry Harvey described the Abilene Paradox as the inability to manage agreement rather than the inability to manage conflict.  This inability to manage agreement is the essential symptom that defines individuals and organizations caught in the web of the Abilene Paradox.

Consider this workplace scenario:

Sue, Tony, Jasmine and their manager, Chris, all have strong reservations about implementing a proposed procedural change.  Individually, each one is convinced the change will cause more problems than it will solve.  BUT, because the proposed change was suggested by a highly-paid consultant, and because no one else is voicing their concerns, each individual claims to support the plan (when they really don’t). The procedural change goes forward…seemingly with unanimous consent.  Later, when troubling operational issues surface, the  group members get annoyed with  one another and blame the consultant for giving bad advice. Eventually—despite a hefty investment in the flawed new procedure—the organization decides to go back to the old way of doing things.  Susan, Tony, Jasmine and Chris never discuss the matter again. (more…)

Managing Ethical Dilemmas

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

Managing Ethical Dilemmas TrainingThere’s a major project deadline coming up, and your participation in this afternoon’s meeting is crucial.  But you’re pretty sure you’ve caught the flu your kids brought home from school last week.

Do you go to work, or do you stay home?

You are under pressure to hit your monthly performance goal, a goal that – if met – would simultaneously enable your team to hit its quarterly goal. You see two options: rush a project that would let you put some numbers on the board now. Or, continue to take your time with this project, knowing that the final results will be far better if you spend more time on it…even if it means missing this month’s goal.

What do you do? Go for the short-term goal, or focus on getting better results in the long-run?

How can you choose? No matter what you do, you’ll be unhappy – and others may be unhappy with you as well.

Fortunately, there are almost always alternatives to be found – alternatives that lead to choices you can live with, instead of choices that make you miserable. (more…)


 

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